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Dimming switches have been around for a while. They are used to set the tone of the room or make it a little less bright for sensitive eyes. But did you know that dimming switches can also save you energy in your home? 

While they look great, the U.S. Department of Energy also reports that dimming switches lessen the amount of electricity a light bulb uses if they’re on at a lower setting. Just like any light bulb, lights hooked up to a dimmer switch can run into issues and might not run properly. If you have a light dimmer switch in your home, you should know the signs of any potential problems. 

LEDs Can Lead to Issues

While LED lights have been around for a while, they are still relatively new to the light bulb world. Many people struggle when pairing them with their dimming switches. One simple fix is to make sure your LED light is a dimmable bulb. If it isn’t compatible, it won’t work. 

Even with a dimming switch compatible LED bulb, people still struggle with achieving the lighting they are hoping for. Sure, LED lights are better for the environment and we recommend them to save money on your electricity bill, but they might not be the best option in dimmer switches. LED’s are designed to use less electricity, so dimming their already low wattage doesn’t always work.

Prevent Burnout

A common issue in homes with dimming switches is plugging too many lights into one switch. Pay attention to the wattage the switch can handle and each device needs. Two lights that need 100 wattages are fine to put with one switch that can run up to 500 wattages. Seven lamps at 100 wattages each would burn out the switch. By paying attention to the switch, you can keep your device working longer while creating a unique ambiance in your living room. 

While dimming switches can add a special touch to any room’s vibe, they do run into issues. If you’ve followed the tips we’ve listed and checked your switches to make sure they meet dimming switch criteria but are still having issues, contact us today